Tag Archives: 2013

“Straight outta Jersey. Come check it.” – Fred Gall – Domestics and OJ Wheels

Fred Gall and friends (specifically Joe Dorsi) started Domestics as a skate shop at some point in the early years of the 21st century in Carteret, New Jersey. Finding more success with making clothing (and not properly zoned for clothing production at the shop), it eventually moved to a warehouse where it continues churning out screenprinted shirts and hand-sewn jackets, bags, and other soft goods to this day, made right here in the US of A; Including the Fred Gall Signature Lightweight Work Pants. They also make pandemic face masks. In 2013, they released a little Fred Gall promo part. It’s pretty badass.

It’s got some all-time Freddy moments in there like the kickflip backside noseblunt to backside revert, a dump truck into a dump truck, and a heavy gap into bank ollie in front of a dozen mesmerized Cambodians. And I bet you missed that crustition fakie kickflip.

Freddy didn’t do many fakie flips.

Most monumentally, Freddy takes things up a notch at his hometown Metropark narrow street quarter pipe thing, a spot he has been continually fucking up for a while now, with a this beauty:

Fred talked about the origin of the name ‘Domestics’ in a 2008 Thrasher interview:
There was this bar next to my mom’s house when I was 18, and I would go and drink beers in there. I would order Budweiser by telling the bartender, ‘I’ll have another Domestic.’ I got kicked out of there so many times, but I lived next door so I would put on costumes and go back in there. I’d dress up as different factory workers.

Habitat also released Search the Horizon in 2013. Not a bad video, but very much focused on the newer riders like Al Davis, DeLa Torre, and Mark Suciu. Freddy only had 3 tricks.

Freddy’s tricks are at 11:30

A few months before the release of Search the Horizon, Pacific Vector Holding Inc. had bought a controlling share in the DNA brands: Alien Workshop, Habitat, and Reflex bearings. Within a year they would be dismantling it. This, along with a lot of highly publicized departures, led to the temporary end of Alien. But Habitat, thanks to a lot of Castrucci efforts and a short-lived distribution deal with Tum Yeto, kept itself more-or-less together. Fred stayed on the team, but found his role being diminished. As Kerry Getz and Tim O’Conner would fade into retirement, now Gall would not only be the last of the 1990s Alien Team to remain, but the final member of the original Habitat line-up still standing.

photo by Xeno Tsarnas

Fred, like so many skateboarders before him (and along with him (and also in the future)), lost a lot of productivity down the black hole of the NYC party scene around this time. Somewhere in the haze he found himself spending a brief amount of time locked up, a brief amount of time being married, finding a job in the construction industry, helping build the Shorty’s Place DIY park, and skating regularly in front of Andrew Petillo’s lens.

Which leads us to our (almost) final Fred Gall part (for now). A two and a half minute promo for his new wheel with OJs, released in 2015, called, logically enough, Freddy Gall for OJ Wheels!

As has become the trend, several tricks in this part were seen before. Regardless, the part itself still holds up pretty well. 82% of the tricks are on crust, 24% are wallrides, and 52% are on some kind of transition. A couple of key moments would be the backside 270 ollie nosepick to 270 revert out, the hefty quarter to quarter frontside flip, and the 1-2 punch of the gap to frontside tailslide on the banked ledge followed by a quickie hippie jump.

But wait, there’s more… I just learned that in late 2015 Freddy shared a part with Al Davis and DeLa in John Valenti‘s Local Express video. John’s filming is always impeccable, and Fred, as usual, destroys some banked ledges from both stances.

Freddy starts around 11:20

Bonus Fred:
Fred Gall tours the Domestics warehouse and talks about spots in this early video from Jenkem:

Bonus Bonus Fred:
In Search the Horizon, Mark Suciu did a little homage to the master…

Bonus Bonus Bonus Fred:
The Scum League, sponsored by OJ Wheels, returned to a rain-soaked Shorty’s Place in 2013.

Bonus Bonus Bonus Bonus Fred:
Now you can learn to patch spots with as much skill and craftsmanship as master bondo artisan Fred Gall in this 2014 Jenkem instructional video:

Bonus Bonus Bonus Bonus Bonus Fred:
Some Thrasher content featuring Freddy’s First Look at the mag from 2013. Some great moments here such as Freddy pining for Geoff Rowley’s Vans’ paycheck, giving ex-teammate Austin Gillette some sass, affectionately calling Dylan a “ladyboy”, and counting stairs like a skate rat.

Check back in the Warm Up Zone cause we ain’t done. Uncle Freddy hasn’t released a ‘part’ since 2015, but he hasn’t been silent either. We still have plenty more Fred to ponder including the dark years that culminated with whatever the fuck it was that happened at Bam’s, our hero gets sober and then gets busy, and Freddy tells us what he his cooking up for the future.

Everybody loves Pat Burke.

Say what will you will about Virginia, but it has produced two things that have made this world a better place to live in… Gwar and Pat Burke. And while it is common enough to find a person who can’t or won’t appreciate the theatrical artistry that is Gwar, I am yet to have ever met a person (or even a person who has met a person) who doesn’t think Pat Burke is awesome. Everybody loves Pat.

There are several hits in the Big Pat-B discography that I indulge in regularly, with two freshies coming up in the past year to go along with his decade-overdue pro model. But the one that gets me grinning again and again is the 2013 stand alone gem that is Pat Burke & $lave.

Pat Burke is like a muppet on a skateboard. Arms akimbo. Sweaty hair flopping. He falls like a bag of laundry and it feels like that next slam is coming at any second, probably when he is not even trying a trick. Pat isn’t graceful. Pat is sloppy and silly and unpretentious. But God DAMN he seems like he is having a lot of fun. And Pat is having fun, I am having fun.

Pat Burke & $lave hits all the notes for a feel good make-you-wanna-go-skate track. It’s got great driving music (Going Down by Freddy King), some decent slams, some tricks that got away (the frontside 360 ollie heelflip!, or the frontside flip in the rain), and his nollie backside flips are just magnificent.

So get loose and get down with Pat. I guarantee you’ll feel good after watching this part.

Pat Burke and $lave

 

Chris Joslin Prequels – Episode 1 – New Ground

22 years after Pat Duffy done changed the game with his video-opening debut part in Plan B’s 1992 Questionable Video, the scepter was passed.

Once again, decades after Questionable, Pat was back on Plan B and back in a Plan B video. But he was present less to skate (although, unlike he fellow Plan B OGs Danny and Colin, he does skate), but more as a symbol of a legacy. Pat is the prototype of an unknown entity who emerges from out of nowhere to knock skating up several notches, making himself famous in the process and affirming that Plan B is, in fact, a skateboarding super team.

Plan B’s True video in 2014 very well might have been remembered for all the wrong reasons. The broken promise of yet another missing Danny Way part. The continued disenchantment with an absentee Colin MacKay. Pat Duffy’s brave effort that nevertheless puts forth undeniable evidence that he is, in fact, over the hill. Trevor McClung disrespecting a post-slamming on-the-clock pizza delivery boy who left it all on the field. Felipe Gustavo inducing yawns as he gets ill on the final 6 inches of a slippery low ledge. The wrong Decenzo brother. And, of course, the most famous skateboarding trick that never happened in skateboarding history, Sheckler’s claimed El Toro backside flip. One can see why filmmaker Eric Bragg and the Plan B board of directors went all-in by promoting the bombshell debut of their newest am. A reintroduction to the “Theory of Pat”.

And it worked.

Chris Joslin‘s hammerfest in True, indeed, set the bar unfathomably high. Now, over half a decade later, I say his two song part is still unmatched in the world of high-impact street skating. It is an achievement and should be celebrated. It was worth the iTunes admission price to an otherwise lackluster video. But was this the first the world had seen of Joslin? Not quite.

Curiously, etnies shoes (the lowercase is correct, apparently) jumped the gun with a welcome to the team part that came out a little over a month prior to True. It’s actually a really good part if you ignore the 2 minutes of ‘credits’ footage and probably the worst Goat song you could select. But for those of us taking notes, it greatly reduced the potential impact of the Plan B video. I’m not sure how or why etnies got out the gate first with Chris. Probably shoe money, even Sole Tech level shoe money, trumps board brand money.

Digging even deeper, Joslin gave the world an even earlier taste of his talent with 50 seconds of fury as part of a montage in Bones Wheels’ New Ground video in 2013. While the etnies thing was definitely filmed in conjunction with Plan B and is of the same timeframe, the Bones’ part is from Joslin’s prehistoric Powell days.

From ages 14-16 or so, Chris was sponsored by perpetually sinking ship that is 21st century Powell Peralta skateboards. He went on a Pacific Northwest summer tour with them in the summer of 2012, according to this amazingly still active Powell-Peralta blog. According to an interview with Nieratko in 2014 (for the X-Games), Joslin was aware of his coming ascension and what role Powell would play: “… everyone always knows that Powell-Peralta is a stepping stone in a way, so it was meant for me to leave, in a sense.”
Then-and-now Powell team manager Deville Nunes must have agreed, as he apparently brokered the deal that sent Joslin to Plan B. It is worth noting that Powell completely dropped all their team (except Cab) in 2013.

All Joslin’s tricks in New Ground are just completely ludicrous in size and cleanliness. The final backside 360 ollie kickflip was pretty much the exclusive property of Chris Cole at the time. And that little extra flavor is tossed in the mix with that out-of-character banked no-comply tailslide to quirky 360 shove it nose manual makes the whole thing that much more entertaining.

Who is this kid? Where did he come from? How the hell was the first ever footage from a talent this monumental just crammed into a montage in the middle of an online wheel video?

Or was it this not truly our first possible dose of Joslin? Tune in next episode and find out.